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Dakotaraptor

Hi everybody. Here is my latest Hell Creek paleo-art. Say hello to Dakotaraptor steini, a large dromaeosaurid raptor that lived in South Dakota at the end of the Cretaceous Period. How large? We don’t have an exact measurement because this animal is known only from partial remains. However, enough was recovered to give a ballpark estimate that the creature measured somewhere around 15 to 20 feet long. Not as big as Utahraptor, but still pretty impressive.

Dakotaraptor steini. © Jason R. Abdale. May 26, 2018.

This drawing was made with No. 2 pencil, Crayola and Prismacolor colored pencils, a black felt-tipped marker, and A LOT of touch up work on the computer in order to make the scanned image as bold and vivid as it is in real life.

Ornithomimus, Before and After

Hello all. I’ve recently finished an important writing project that I’ve been laboring upon for months. Now that it’s finished, I have a little breathing room to do art, and this is what I’ve done so far. I decided to do an updated version of an old illustration that I had made of an Ornithomimus. While the general color scheme was what I had in mind, I was never truly happy with the end-product. This latest version is much more in line with what I was imagining the “Bird Mimic” would look like.

Here is the “before” picture, made in 2013.

 

And here is the “after”, made today.

 

You’ll notice several differences right away, the most noteable of them being the re-shaping of its wing feathers. While Ornithomimus, or perhaps ornithomimids in general, had pennaceous feathers, I don’t think that they had primaries, because those would have been attached onto the wrist and the hand. This would have been difficult for ornithomimids because, unlike “raptor” dinosaurs (dromaeosaurids and troodontids), ornithomimids could not flex their hands backwards. I also increased the size of its tail feathers, made the neck thicker, changed the shape of the skull so that it was more anatomically accurate, and added Secretary Bird-style feathers to the back of its head. So much for form. In terms of color, I made it more vibrant, with deeper richer yellows and oranges and a lot more black patches. I changed the color of its bare skin from pink to a mixture of tan and black. I made its beak black, I changed its eye from yellow to blood red, and gave it black feet.

I can definitely see this character rushing about on the plains of the Hell Creek Formation. This shows that artists should never be stagnant. They must always strive to improve their work, and in so doing, improve their skill.

This drawing was made on computer printer paper with a No. 2 pencil, Prismacolor colored pencils, markers, and a black felt-tiped pen. The size of the drawing, from the tip of its nose to the tip of its tail feathers, measures 10.75 inches long, which is almost 1/12 scale, as the real animal possibly measured 12 feet long with its neck and tail fully stretched out.

Keep your pencils sharp.

Acheroraptor: A new “raptor” dinosaur from the Hell Creek Formation

A few days ago, scientists announced the discovery of a new species of dinosaur – Acheroraptor, “thief from Acheron”. I’m sorry to disappoint all of you Aliens fans, but no, this dinosaur is NOT named after Planet LV-426, code-named “Acheron”. The name actually refers to the Acheron River in ancient Greek mythology, “the River of Pain”. This name is an obvious pun on the name of the place where the fossils were discovered – the Hell Creek Formation in Montana.

Not much is known about this animal, but here are a few statistics. As you can probabaly guess, Acheroraptor is one of the “raptor” dinosaurs made famous by Jurassic Park. Raptors are divided up into two main groups: the dromaeosaurids and the troodontids. Acheroraptor was a dromaeosaurid, and this brings up another issue…

In an earlier post, I talked about Dromaeosaurus, a dromaeosaurid raptor from western North America. I had stated that its teeth had been found in several different locations, including the Hell Creek Formation. Well, that was perfectly true when I wrote it, but not anymore. For the past few decades, paleontologists had been finding raptor teeth in the HCF, and since they looked similar to the teeth of Dromaeosaurus, these teeth were ascribed to that genus. However, Dromaeosaurus was only known from Canada, and its fossils were found in rocks that were dated much older than the Hell Creek Formation – ten million years older, to be exact. But few other raptor dinosaurs were known from late Cretaceous western North America, and the teeth did look more or less similar to the teeth of Dromaeosaurus, and so that was the identification that was given. Now, paleontologists have discovered that all this time they were perpetuating a case of mistaken identity. It actually happens quite often in this particular science. It appears that the teeth which had been found in the HCF for decades actually belonged to this new species, not Dromaeosaurus.

Acheroraptor’s fossils were found in rocks dated to the extreme end of the Cretaceous Period, 65.5 million years ago, right when the dinosaurs became extinct. It therefore appears that Acheroraptor is the earliest-known raptor, geologically-speaking, being around right up the the point when the asteroid hit.

There are few fossils to go on, consisting of a partial maxilla, a partial dentary, and numerous isolated teeth. Based upon shape and size, paleontologists have determined that Acherorapror was a dromaeosaurid, rather closely related to Velociraptor, and have hypothesized that it may have reached ten feet long. Perhaps in the near future, more fossils will be uncovered which will give us a more complete picture of this animal.

And speaking of pictures, here’s my picture of Acheroraptor! – good segway, right? I further improved the wings from my old Troodon and Ornithomimus drawings, and I made the subject a little more three-dimensional. Rather than standing perfectly sideways, it’s positioned on an angle.

I drew the first sketch when I was giving my English students their final exam on Wednesday December 18, and then I polished off the final product when I got home. I had originally intended it to be a full scene with the dinosaur walking along a forest pathway, but I wanted to get a drawing posted right away, and I just didn’t have the time to make a full Henderson-esque setting.

UPDATE: The original Acheroraptor drawing has been removed, because it was too inaccurate.

The striking black-white color scheme is based upon the coloration of the Northern Goshawk. If this drawing was in color, I would have given my creature transparent glassy red eyes. Making this drawing was a real pleasure, and I’m surprised that doing it didn’t take as long as I had expected – only five days. Keep your pencils sharp!

Dromaeosaurus

Dromaeosaurus

Dromaeosaurus albertensis was a six-foot carnivore which lived in western North America during the Late Cretaceous Period. It is a distant cousin of Deinonychus and Velociraptor. Only one fragmentary skeleton was found in Alberta, Canada, although its teeth have been found in a number of localities, including the Hell Creek Formation. Like many members of Maniraptora, it is believed that Dromaeosaurus had feathers.

This drawing was made using that same time-consuming polygonal scale design that I used on my Giganotosaurus and Troodon drawings. I felt that I should make the scales as small as possible for this guy. Keep your pencils sharp.