Dinosaurs and Barbarians

Home » Posts tagged '18th Century'

Tag Archives: 18th Century

Portrait of a Huron war-chief

Huron chief Long Spear

Hello all. This is a portrait of a war-chief of the Huron tribe named Long Spear – I don’t know how to say that in Huron/Wyandot, but I’m certain somebody out there knows. This person was supposed to be a character in a video game set in the French and Indian War that my friend Andrew and I were going to develop years ago, but that idea unfortunately never got off of the ground.

I found the original version of this man’s portrait that I had made back in 2005, I think – there was no date on it, but I’m pretty sure that’s when I first drew him. The overall pose and design was the same, but it was less detailed, done with markers instead of colored pencils, and was rather sloppy. I decided to re-make Long Spear’s portrait, and the result is what you see here.

Media for this portrait include:

  • No. 2 pencil
  • Crayola and Prismacolor colored pencils
  • Black felt-tip marker

I’m sure that many of you will likely see the influence that Wes Studi’s portrayal of Magua in the film The Last of the Mohicans had on this design. However, I tried very hard not to make a clone copy of THAT Huron war-chief! If you have any questions or comments, please write them. Hope you enjoy my latest work. Keep your pencils sharp, everyone.

Prince Frederick Augustus

Prince Frederick Augustus 1815

Here is a portrait of Prince Frederick Augustus (1763-1827), the younger brother of Britain’s King George IV. This is how he would have looked at or around the year 1815, I think. It’s thanks to him that the British Army, which had previously been in a state of neglect, was reformed and able to beat back Napoleon. The portrait is somewhat based on an existing portrait by John Jackson dated to 1822 (see here). He is garbed in clothes typical of the early 19th Century. On his chest is a medal from the Order of the Garter.

I found out after making this picture that I made one big mistake – Prince Frederick had blonde hair, not dark hair. Oops.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prince_Frederick,_Duke_of_York_and_Albany

Keep your pencils sharp, everybody.

General Jean Armand, Baron von Dieskau

2014 has been rather hectic for me, between frantically looking for jobs, pounding on the writing, and doing schoolwork. This weekend, I FINALLY found some free time to do a little bit of illustration, and the result is what you see here.

Lately, I’ve been on a colonial history kick. One of my writing projects is on the French and Indian War – I decided to temporarily shelve my book on ancient Egypt. I intend for this book to be fully illustrated, and one of the pictures that will be in it will be this portrait of a French officer. His name was General Jean Ludwig August Armand, Baron von Dieskau. He was a German-born officer who fought in the French Army during the opening stages of the French and Indian War.

Baron Dieskau

 

 

Onderdonk House – Brooklyn, New York

At the beginning of September, I visited the Vander-Ende Onderdonk House, located in Brooklyn, New York. I’m very interested in colonial American history, and I’m surprised by how much from that time period can be found within the five boroughs of New York City. You may have to go out of your way to find these places, but it will be worth the wait and the effort.

This building, more commonly known simply as the Onderdonk House, was constructed in the very early 1700s. It’s actually, according to the website, the oldest stone house built according to the “Dutch colonial” style within NYC that is still standing. It currently serves as the headquarters for the Greater Ridgewood Historical Society.

I had no idea that this place existed (again, you’d be surprised how much historical stuff is in NYC that hardly anyone knows about) until that day, and I went there to visit the Battle of Brooklyn re-enactment that they had during the weekend. Well, it wasn’t really a re-enactment; it was more like a “life in a Revolutionary army camp” sort of thing. They handed out samples of beef-and-pea soup (it was okay, but it desperately needed salt). Still, I had a good time.

If you want to know more about it, visit the following website:

http://www.onderdonkhouse.org/

If you’re interested in early New York history or colonial American history in general, then I highly suggest that you visit there.

I took some pictures while I was there, which i will now put here on display for you. I hope you enjoy.

 

2013_09050003

2013_09050005

2013_09050007

2013_09050013

2013_09050035

2013_09050049